Black Lilies

I'm Cat. Fandoms I belong to: Star Trek, Merlin, Doctor Who, Sherlock, Fullmetal Alchemist, the Avengers, Lord of the Rings, Arrow.
mechinaries:

the next song on their playlist is Anaconda and you bet your ass they know every single lyric

mechinaries:

the next song on their playlist is Anaconda and you bet your ass they know every single lyric

(via sonofplutomars)

therothwoman:

gunpowderandspark:

According to the song Seasons of Love from RENT, there are 525,600 minutes a year.

One line later, there are “525,000 Moments so dear”.

So, doing the math, we can glean that there are 600 moments which aren’t so dear.

And I think I just used one of them by walking in on my boss who forgot to lock the bathroom stall.

this post did not even remotely go in the direction I was expecting it to

(via passiveaggressivegummybear)

mercurykiss:

gentlemanbones:

camerapits:

themiracleofmusic:

oh.

Actually, I think the kid is playing Minecraft. Which is essentially digital Legos.
Two generations of creative people, just different methods of expression. Let’s not shit on the digital age as much, ‘eh?

You know what’s great about Minecraft?
You don’t get lacerations from stepping on it.

You know what’s great about legos?Your shit doesn’t get blown up because a green penis snuck up on you.

mercurykiss:

gentlemanbones:

camerapits:

themiracleofmusic:

oh.

Actually, I think the kid is playing Minecraft. Which is essentially digital Legos.

Two generations of creative people, just different methods of expression. Let’s not shit on the digital age as much, ‘eh?

You know what’s great about Minecraft?

You don’t get lacerations from stepping on it.

You know what’s great about legos?

Your shit doesn’t get blown up because a green penis snuck up on you.

(via sonofplutomars)

drugdoer:

grassfire:

Imagine if Breaking Bad was set in Canada or the UK or Australia. Walt discovers he has lung cancer, is promptly treated at no cost and discharged with no financial burden apart from $20 in subsidised prescriptions. The end.

hmm. it’s almost as if Breaking Bad might have been trying to say something. Who knows, though

(via weinerchesters)

radioactivesoup:

kk-maker:

2spoopy5you:

lohelim:

winterthirst:

sabacc:

Steve Rogers did, in fact, realize that something was off when he saw the outline of the woman’s odd bra (a push-up bra, he would later learn), but being an officer and a gentleman, he said that it was the game that gave the future away.

 (via)

No, see, this scene is just amazing. The costume department deserves so many kudos for this, it’s unreal, especially given the fact that they pulled off Peggy pretty much flawlessly.

1) Her hair is completely wrong for the 40’s. No professional/working woman  would have her hair loose like that. Since they’re trying to pass this off as a military hospital, Steve would know that she would at least have her hair carefully pulled back, if maybe not in the elaborate coiffures that would have been popular.

2) Her tie? Too wide, too long. That’s a man’s tie, not a woman’s. They did, however, get the knot correct as far as I can see - that looks like a Windsor.

3) That. Bra. There is so much clashing between that bra and what Steve would expect (remember, he worked with a bunch of women for a long time) that it has to be intentional. She’s wearing a foam cup, which would have been unheard of back then. It’s also an exceptionally old or ill-fitting bra - why else can you see the tops of the cups? No woman would have been caught dead with misbehaving lingerie like that back then, and the soft satin cups of 40’s lingerie made it nearly impossible anyway. Her breasts are also sitting at a much lower angle than would be acceptable in the 40’s.

Look at his eyes. He knows by the time he gets to her hair that something is very, very wrong.

so what you are saying is S.H.E.I.L.D. has a super shitty costume division….

Nope, Nick Fury totally did this on purpose.

There’s no knowing what kind of condition Steve’s in, or what kind of person he really is, after decades of nostalgia blur the reality and the long years in the ice (after a plane crash and a shitload of radiation) do their work. (Pre-crash Steve is in lots of files, I’m sure. Nick Fury does not trust files.) So Fury instructs his people to build a stage, and makes sure that the right people put up some of the wrong cues.

Maybe the real Steve’s a dick, or just an above-average jock; maybe he had a knack for hanging out with real talent. Maybe he hit his head too hard on the landing and he’s not gonna be Captain anymore. On the flipside, if he really is smart, then putting him in a standard, modern hospital room and telling him the truth is going to have him clamming up and refusing to believe a goddamn thing he hears for a really long time.

The real question here is, how long it does it take for the man, the myth, the legend to notice? What does he do about it? How long does he wait to get his bearings, confirm his suspicions, and gather information before attempting busting out?

Turns out the answer’s about forty-five seconds.

#STEVE YOU RECKLESS FUCK #’we need a plan’ my ass #how about ‘break everything until I’m outside and then figure shit out from there’ #A+ steve you win (tags via bluandorange)

(via timeandspaceletsrun)

Teachers are often unaware of the gender distribution of talk in their classrooms. They usually consider that they give equal amounts of attention to girls and boys, and it is only when they make a tape recording that they realize that boys are dominating the interactions. Dale Spender, an Australian feminist who has been a strong advocate of female rights in this area, noted that teachers who tried to restore the balance by deliberately ‘favouring’ the girls were astounded to find that despite their efforts they continued to devote more time to the boys in their classrooms. Another study reported that a male science teacher who managed to create an atmosphere in which girls and boys contributed more equally to discussion felt that he was devoting 90 per cent of his attention to the girls. And so did his male pupils. They complained vociferously that the girls were getting too much talking time.

In other public contexts, too, such as seminars and debates, when women and men are deliberately given an equal amount of the highly valued talking time, there is often a perception that they are getting more than their fair share. Dale Spender explains this as follows:

“The talkativeness of women has been gauged in comparison not with men but with silence. Women have not been judged on the grounds of whether they talk more than men, but of whether they talk more than silent women.”

In other words, if women talk at all, this may be perceived as ‘too much’ by men who expect them to provide a silent, decorative background in many social contexts.